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Welcome to new editors at G3 and GENETICS

GENETICS and G3: Genes | Genomes | Genetics are pleased to announce six new editors: Sharon Browning, Leah Cowen, Gustavo de los Campos, Michael Goddard, Joseph Heitman, and Hongyu Zhao.

GENETICS

Sharon Browning

Sharon Browning

Sharon Browning is a Professor of Biostatistics at the University of Washington. She received a BS in Mathematics from the University of Auckland, New Zealand, and a PhD in Statistics from the University of Washington under the mentorship of Elizabeth Thompson. She has held positions at North Carolina State University, GlaxoSmithKline, and the University of Auckland, and has been at the University of Washington since 2010. Her lab develops statistical methodology for analysis of large-scale genetic data, with a focus on haplotypes and identity by descent. Her current work includes applications of identity by descent to population genetics inference such as inferring demographic histories and estimating mutation rates and recombination rates.‌‌‌

Leah Cowen

Leah Cowen

Leah Cowen is Vice President of Research at the University of Toronto (UofT), Professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics, co-Director of the CIFAR Fungal Kingdom: Threats & Opportunities program, and co-Founder of Bright Angel Therapeutics—a company that leverages state-of-the-art technologies for development of novel antifungal therapeutics. She received her undergraduate degree from the University of British Columbia, a PhD from UofT, and pursued postdoctoral studies at the Whitehead Institute. She has an outstanding track record of excellence in research, scholarship, and education. She has published over 110 high impact research articles and been recognized with many awards including a Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award, Grand Challenges Canada Star in Global Health Award, Merck Irving S. Sigal Memorial Award, E.W.R. Steacie Award, and Canada Research Chair in Microbial Genomics & Infectious Disease. She has been elected as Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology and American Association for the Advancement of Science.‌

Michael Goddard

Michael Goddard

Michael Goddard works on the genetics of quantitative or complex traits in livestock and in humans. He was a co-author on Meuwissen, Hayes, and Goddard (2001), which first presented genomic prediction or genomic selection. This methodology uses genotypes at markers such as SNPs to predict the genetic value or phenotype of individuals.

Hongyu Zhao

Hongyu Zhao

Dr. Hongyu Zhao is the Ira V. Hiscock Professor of Biostatistics, Genetics, and Statistics and Data Science at Yale University. He received his BS in Probability and Statistics from Peking University and PhD in Statistics from UC Berkeley. His research interests are the developments and applications of statistical methods in molecular biology, genetics, drug developments, and precision medicine. His current projects include the analysis of biobank samples with genomics, imaging, and wearable device data, cancer multi-omics data, brain multi-omics data, and single cell data.

G3: Genes | Genomes | Genetics

Gustavo de los Campos

Gustavo de los Campos

Gustavo de los Campos is a Professor in the Departments of Epidemiology & Biostatistics and Statistics & Probability of Michigan State University. He completed two MS and a PhD degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and postdoctoral training at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). He joined the Faculty of the UAB in 2011 and later joined MSU in 2015. Professor de los Campos leads the QUANTGEN group; his research focuses on the development of methods and software for the analysis and prediction of complex traits as well as applied quantitative genetics research in plants, humans, and animals. He has developed several software packages which are routinely used for genomic analysis of complex traits, including the BGLR-R package, which he developed and maintains in collaboration with Dr. Paulino Perez-Rodriguez. His research has been supported by the NIH, NSF, USDA, and the private industry.

Joseph Heitman

Joseph Heitman

Joseph Heitman, MD, PhD is James B. Duke Professor and Chair, Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke University. His research studies model and pathogenic fungi addressing fundamental questions of scientific and medical importance. Pioneering studies with Baker’s yeast revealed how immunosuppressive natural products interdict signaling cascades via FKBP12-drug complexes, and discovered TOR as a globally conserved nutrient sensor targeted by the immunosuppressive, antiproliferative drug rapamycin. His research discovered unisexual reproduction of pathogenic microbes, with implications for pathogen emergence, how sex generates diversity, and how sex evolved. Dr. Heitman’s lab has developed genetic and genomic approaches elucidating molecular principles of fungal virulence, identifying therapeutic targets, and illustrating convergent evolution of fungal mating-type loci with mammalian, insect, and plant sex chromosomes, defined the calcium-activated protein phosphatase calcineurin as a conserved fungal virulence factor, and elucidated functions of RNAi in microbial pathogen genome integrity, hypervirulent outbreak lineages, and drug resistance via epimutation. 

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